User Tools

Site Tools


env_sensor

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
env_sensor [2015/01/03 00:50]
breaker27 [Partlist (in buildup order)]
env_sensor [2018/02/18 19:39] (current)
breaker27 [Partlist (in buildup order)]
Line 12: Line 12:
 |    1     | PCB Generic Midi 1                      |             ​| ​ {{ parts:​pcb_maxi_speed.jpg }}       | |    1     | PCB Generic Midi 1                      |             ​| ​ {{ parts:​pcb_maxi_speed.jpg }}       |
 |    1     | Resistor 560R green-blue-brown ​         | R1          |  {{ parts:​resistor_560r.jpg }}        | |    1     | Resistor 560R green-blue-brown ​         | R1          |  {{ parts:​resistor_560r.jpg }}        |
-|    1     | Resistor 150k 0,1% brown-green-black ​   | R2 \\ (firmware < 0.9)   ​| ​ {{ parts:​resistor_150k_0p1.jpg }}    | +|    1     | Resistor 150k 0,1% brown-green-black ​   | R2 \\ (firmware < 0.9) \\ (PCB < 1.4)   ​| ​ {{ parts:​resistor_150k_0p1.jpg }}    | 
-|    1     | Resistor 330k 0,1% orange-orange-black ​ | R3 \\ (firmware < 0.9)   ​| ​ {{ parts:​resistor_330k_0p1.jpg }}    |+|    1     | Resistor 330k 0,1% orange-orange-black ​ | R3 \\ (firmware < 0.9) \\ (PCB < 1.4)   ​| ​ {{ parts:​resistor_330k_0p1.jpg }}    |
 |    1     | Resistor 1M brown-black-green ​          | R4          |  {{ parts:​resistor_1m.jpg }}          | |    1     | Resistor 1M brown-black-green ​          | R4          |  {{ parts:​resistor_1m.jpg }}          |
-|    1     | Resistor 100k brown-black-yellow ​       | R5          |  {{ parts:​resistor_100k.jpg }}        |+|    1     | Resistor 100k brown-black-yellow ​       | R5 (for light sensor) ​   ​|  {{ parts:​resistor_100k.jpg }}        |
 |    1     | Resistor 10k brown-black-orange ​        | R6 (for SHT15), \\ R7 + R8 (for I2C) |  {{ parts:​resistor_10k.jpg }}         | |    1     | Resistor 10k brown-black-orange ​        | R6 (for SHT15), \\ R7 + R8 (for I2C) |  {{ parts:​resistor_10k.jpg }}         |
-|    1     | Resistor 4k7                            | R9 (for 1-wire) |  {{ parts:​resistor_4k7.jpg }}     |+|    1     | Resistor 4k7 yellow-violet-red ​         ​| R9 (for 1-wire) |  {{ parts:​resistor_4k7.jpg }}     |
 |    1     | IC holder ​                              | IC1         ​| ​ {{ parts:​ic_holder.jpg }}            | |    1     | IC holder ​                              | IC1         ​| ​ {{ parts:​ic_holder.jpg }}            |
 |    1     | LED 2mA                                 | LED1        |  {{ parts:​led_yellow.jpg }}           | |    1     | LED 2mA                                 | LED1        |  {{ parts:​led_yellow.jpg }}           |
Line 71: Line 71:
  
 Even if the SHT15 uses partly the same pins as the I2C sensors, they can be connected and used in parallel! Even if the SHT15 uses partly the same pins as the I2C sensors, they can be connected and used in parallel!
 +
 +===== Connect a button or switch =====
 +
 +You can use any of the available I/O pins as a digital input. You have different options regarding the pull-up resistor and therefore the power consumption. The behaviour can be configured with the EEPROM editor.
 +
 +  - If you want to measure the state **only cyclic** after the RFM12 wake-up timeout, it's recommended to use the **internal pull-up resistor** and connect the button / switch against ground. The pull-up is only switched on a very short time when the device is on and therefore draws much less power than connecting a physical pull-up which is connected all the time.
 +  - If you want to detect the botton / switch / pin state **immediately**,​ you need some sort of **permanent pull-up resistor** (assuming the button/... is connected against ground again). **Please note that the pull-up resistor only draws current if the button/... is currently active (pulling the level to low).**
 +    * If you use the internal resistor with its resistance of around 22 kOhm, it would draw about 135µA, which is a lot. This is only recommended if you power your device with a power supply (not batteries).
 +    * The second option is to connect an external (physical) pull-up resistor of 1 MOhm to 10 MOhm. One 1 MOhm pull-up (for one I/O pin) would draw around 3µA (at 3V battery voltage), so this is also noticeable compared to the sleep power consumption of around 1,2µA. Depending on your batteries, amount of I/O pins used as digital input and the percentage of the pin being pulled down by the button/..., you may try a risistor with a higher value like 10 MOhm.
  
 ===== Connect a SHT15 ===== ===== Connect a SHT15 =====
Line 99: Line 108:
 <​clear>​ <​clear>​
  
 +===== Connect a SHT21 / SHT25 =====
 +
 +You can connect these sensors either the same way as the SHT15 (with the Sensirion specific protocol) or connect it as a I2C device. Configure the E2P accordingly.
 +
 +In principle, you can solder the sensor directly to cables. But the sensor is very tiny, so you should have some experience when trying to do that. Make sure to solder only one cable at a time and let the solder cool off to not overheat the sensor!
 +
 +I recommend to mount the sensor + cables to something to make sure the solder joints don't break off.
 +
 +{{sht25_size.jpg?​nolink |}}{{sht25_pinout.jpg?​nolink |}}{{sht25_mounted.jpg?​nolink |}}
 +
 +<​clear>​
 ===== Connect a DS7505 ===== ===== Connect a DS7505 =====
  
Line 108: Line 128:
  
 {{ds7505_connection.png?​nolink |}} The pins have to be wired as shown here. You need 4k7/10k pull-up resistors as specified by the I2C standard. If you have a Generic Midi PCB Rev. 1.1 and up, just solder R7+R8 to the PCB. If you have an older PCB revision, you have to solder the resistors as shown in the picture. {{ds7505_connection.png?​nolink |}} The pins have to be wired as shown here. You need 4k7/10k pull-up resistors as specified by the I2C standard. If you have a Generic Midi PCB Rev. 1.1 and up, just solder R7+R8 to the PCB. If you have an older PCB revision, you have to solder the resistors as shown in the picture.
 +
 +<​clear>​
 +===== Connect a DHT11 =====
 +
 +//describe it ...//
 +
 +The four pins of the DHT11 are //GND//, //Unused//, //DATA// and //VCC//. Connect //DATA// to //​PC2//​. ​
 +The sensor works when EnvSensor is powered by two AA batteries (90 Percent charge).
  
 <​clear>​ <​clear>​
Line 138: Line 166:
  
 You should use at least AA cells for the environment sensor when using the SRF02 and the voltage converter, because one SRF02 measurement takes about 0.015 mAh, which results in ~800 days battery lifetime at AA cells (2800 mAh) when you make one measurement every 7 minutes. You should use at least AA cells for the environment sensor when using the SRF02 and the voltage converter, because one SRF02 measurement takes about 0.015 mAh, which results in ~800 days battery lifetime at AA cells (2800 mAh) when you make one measurement every 7 minutes.
-===== Integrate it into a housing ===== 
  
-describe it...+ 
 +====== ​ Integrate it into a housing ======  
 +// 
 +describe it...//
env_sensor.1420242640.txt.gz · Last modified: 2015/01/03 00:50 by breaker27